Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 06 Feb 2013 17:02

why not one more related.

Psybient

In Goa (home of Goa Trance) DJ's tended to use cassette tapes or DATs instead of vinyl records (due to the heat and outdoor performances). As a result, beatmatching was difficult. As a solution to the dilemma, a production technique developed of having relatively long atmospheric portions in each track, which would allow a DJ to easily mix two tracks of different tempos without having them clash. These short periods that were free of heavy, bass driven beats acted as "chillout" periods for those who were dancing to relax and regain their energy for the next track. Also Goa albums (as well as compilations) almost always contained a compulsory "chillout" track. Thus formed psybient (psychedelic ambient) which were beatless or mostly ambient and eventually became entirely album and artist based. Significant landmarks for Psybient occured in the 90's before Ultimae Records formed in 2000 becoming the leading label for this sound.

Full List

Highlights

The Infinity Project - "The Answer" from Mystical Experiences (1995)"

Perhaps the earliest full mainstream album consisting entirely of "chill psychedelic tracks" was Mystical Experiences by The Infinity Project in 1995." ~wiki

"Mystical Experiences isn't just another New Age-ey name, they mean it! This is ambient Goa, but of a different kind than Shpongle, more Eastern and mystical. The Answer is one of the best tracks ever. The Infinity Project was a collaboration between Simon Posford and Raja Ram who also plays the flute on some of the tracks."~karan129

"Imagine your collection of electronic albums as a perfect square, and draw the different albums into their respective corners defined by their musical style. This album is one of four cornerstones. Mystical Experiences is the perfect piece of the puzzle where "psychedelic" and "ambient" comes together (Psybient). The minds and creativity of a trio of skilled musicians; Simon Posford, Raja Ram and Graham Wood (all members of the group "The Mystery of the Yeti") comes together and results in a magnificent release full of diverse and excellent tracks. The different tracks blend into one another so well, you easily drift away into other thoughts.. It's a truce masterpiece from TIP, and it's sure to a make firm stand in any collection of music.~Mattman"




Shpongle - "Shpongle Falls" from Are You Shpongled? (1998)"

Simon's Next album Shpongle - Are You Shpongled? Established the psybient genre even further and still is considered the genres most valued album by most psybient fans."~wiki

"Simon Posford at his best, this time collaborating with Raja Ram to produce some great ambient Goa. Shpongle is really the gold standard for ambient Goa."~karan129

"This release started the Shpongle trilogy and kick-started the entire Psybient scene. A classic for listening under altered states. This is certainly one of the best psychill album I've heard till today, 8 years after it was released, thats a mark of the quality of the release."~murai (discogs)

"Honestly, if there was one album that I would have to pick above all others, it would be this one. And that's from many hundreds. There's just nothing quite so psychedelic, so mysterious, awe-inspiring and ubiquitous as Are You Shpongled. Starting with the amazing Shpongle Falls, the album slowly draws you into a dream state, peaking at the tribal DMT and ending with the beautiful And The Day Turned to Night which brings you down to earth so well that it makes my hairs stand on end just to think about it. " ~Tennant




Shulman - "Instability" (12:36) from In Search of a Meaningful Moment (2003)

"Psychedelic chillout would not be what it is without Shulman and Shpongle. And if Shponlge are the kings of the genre, Shulman is the prince. This is his second album, and is far better then the first (which is also great). Some real trippy chilling epic moments on this album. The last track is one of my favorites of all times. Check it out people!"~bduras1

"Instability" is easily the best track on the album. Chants, pads and effects start up the track in the introduction. When the bassline enters, you get the feeling that this is going to be a faster track - but unusually, this track starts slowly and builds up. Shulman just maintains the slow pace but doesn't change the tempo - only doubling the speed of the drums later in the track - and when he does this, it breaks into an almighty drum and bass / psybient chill crossover track (or whatever you want to call it) - with perhaps the best synth melody in the entire album. This track stands out because it's just so varied - we even get a taste of piano here and there."~shaft

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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby ph00tbag » 07 Feb 2013 01:08

Goa will do. Suomisaundi is a fair bit more experimental, with less of a focus on phrygian scales. But it's also more melodic than most of what people call psytrance.

Also, it's made by Finns.

But really it's all psytrance anyway.
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 07 Feb 2013 07:44

ph00tbag wrote:Goa will do. Suomisaundi is a fair bit more experimental, with less of a focus on phrygian scales. But it's also more melodic than most of what people call psytrance.

Also, it's made by Finns.

But really it's all psytrance anyway.


Yeah and i must say I'm really digging checking it out and I'm about 2/3 through putting a set together for that as well. It is just a little wilder version of psytrance but with enough chacrteristics to make it it's own thing. Hopefully i can post that later today.
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 07 Feb 2013 18:33

and it is done. :D

Suomisaundi

Suomisaundi (also knopwn as spugedelic trance) is a style of freestyle psychedelic trance that originated in Finland around the mid-1990s. "Suomisaundi" literally means "Finnish sound" in Finnish. The genre is generally not as formulaic as most current psytrance, with artists having more freedom to explore their own individual sounds and styles. The most recognizable element of this style is that it has no set rules apart from basic trance elements such as the four-on-the-floor kick drum that has characterized the majority of electronic dance music styles to date. Suomisaundi tracks are usually very melodic, including heavy influences from early Goa, tribal beats and acid trance tracks, as well as funky guitar/keyboard loops and sounds from or reminiscent of 1980's video and computer games. Some artists such as Luomuhappo and Tekniset have incorporated Finnish folk melodies into their tracks, giving their music a more distinct Finnish sound. Finnish nature has also played an important role in the direction of the Finnish sound, with suomisaundi parties frequently taking place in the forests of Finland and tracks and albums often referencing this aspect of the genre. Songs frequently include distorted sampling, layers and combinations of effects, tricky drum fills and breaks, as well as speech samples in Finnish or in English. On many occasions there are forms of strange humor and/or self-irony in the music or in the track titles. Some even describe the suomi-style of psytrance as anarchistic in the trance music scene, because the songs are usually very different and progressive compared to mainstream European psytrance tracks.

Full List

Highlights

Texas Faggott - "Hoosianna" from Petoman's Peflett (2000)

"The popularity of Texas Faggott grew amongst the Finnish trance scene with their second release, Petoman's Peflett in 2000. Group memberTim Thick has been an active promoter of Finnish psy-trance, as he established and operated Thixx'n'Dixx in 2000, a site offering free MP3 downloads from almost all of the existing Finnish psy-trance artists including tracks from his own groups."~wikipedia

"This is Texas Faggott's highlight in my honest opinion. This album epitomises the rare beauty of Finnish electronic/psytrance music. Quirky is a word which springs to mind when I listen to this album. Quirky, twisted and extremely psychedelic. Many people find it hard to take this album seriously, others (even seasoned psytrance listeners) find it to be little more than a collection of random noises loosely structured by a inconsistent bass line. For this reason I do not recommend this album to everyone.

I do recommend this album to psytrance listeners who prefer the psychedelic side to the trance side of psytrance. I also wouldn't suggest this to people who are new to electronic music (unless you are a quirky, twisted and extremely psychedelic person [such as myself])"~Crosley

"May I present you the undisputed crown of suomisaundi! TF is quite good with their self-titled deput already but here they really peak. The music takes itself with self-irony and should be approached with Simon Posford, or better yet, David Archuleta kinda smile. The music is probably best understood by Japanese or Finnish people, who spend most of their days keeping their mouth shut, but in the weekends open the vodka bottle, pop those depression pills, and let the wordy coffin loose. This album, even if being totally hilarious with all the sampling, quirky melodies and fast unexpected change of themes, is detailed with the utmost talent. That's the charm this album holds. It takes a lot of courage to even try to translate the sort of "asylum mentality" into sound, and a mastermind to end up with phenomenal results like this. This is one of a kind album even in suomiscene, and has inspired countless of later artists. It's much of this album's example that has given us the suomisaundi genre we know today."~canyon-kalle




Haltya - "Twisturbed Fok'n Manmal" from Forest Flavour (2001)

Haltya is a collaboration between PeLinPala (Tommi Sirkiä) and Outolintu (Jürgen Sachau).
"Haltya has captured a nice blend of super psychedelic noizez and dark creepy omnipresent darkness under the happy shade. The album is most defenitely funny and a bit child like in a nice cool way, but with something lurkin around the corner to grab you into the mists of magic. This is a time classic, with wich i mean that this is propably one of those records wich doesn´t get boring after a while - it´s timeless. I could listen to this mad stuff still in 10 years or so. 10 whole points for these artists and the art guy who painted that beautiful cover and everything! It´s such a beatiful album and very scandinavian. This should set a standard for finnish madness:)"




Luomuhappo - "Linnahomo" from Pog-o-Matic Pogómen 3000000 (2004)

"Luomuhappo is 23 year old Jere Häkkinen from Funland and this is his second album on Freakdance Records, which he’s also a founding member of. Luomuhappo roughly translates into ‘organic acid’ and I’m guessing Jere had more than a single zip of grandpa Häkkinen’s cough-medicin when he sat down and composed this… But, before we dig deeper into the music, let me just take a second to talk about the cover art, which is among the coolest I’ve seen in a long time… Designed by Jere himself, this is quite the eye catcher with its rustic appearance, simplistic style and naïve old-school cartoon-approach – I like it!

It’s no secret that after my listen, I liked the latter part of this album best… I’ve often had a hard time digesting larger portions of perverted Finnish trance, and some of the faster tracks were a bit too… ehhm …fast, for my taste… But after repeated listens the first part has grown on me, and I’ve almost grown equally fond of both parts of the album… There are some very interesting ideas unfolding here – some of which work better than others, but for the most part it’s very well done… "~Death Posture



Really cool stuff. Glad this was recommended to check out!! :lol:
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 15 Feb 2013 19:05

Well no reponse to my last post so here's part one of a request.

Electro (Old School)

The TR-808, created in 1980, had an immediately recognizable sound. Electro instrumentation is generally all-electronic, favoring analog synthesis, funk-style bass lines, sequenced or arpeggiated synthetic riffs, and atonal sound effects all created with synthesizers. Heavy use of effects such as reverbs, delays, chorus or phasers along with synthetic ensemble strings or pad sounds emphasize the common science fiction or futuristic theme of the lyrics and/or music. Most electro is instrumental, but a common element is vocals processed through a vocoder. Additionally, speech synthesis may be used to create robotic or mechanical lyrical content. Some earlier electro features rapping, but this list looks at the tracks more associated with Electronic music and less directly connected with Hip-Hop artists (as seen in this list). Early Electro influenced the genres of Detroit techno, ghettotech, breakbeat, electroclash, and electro in the current decade."

Full List

Highlights

Afrika Bambaataa & The Soul Sonic Force - Planet Rock (1982) [Single]

"In 1982, Bronx based producer Afrika Bambaataa released the seminal track "Planet Rock", which contained elements of Kraftwerk's Trans-Europe Express and "Numbers" (from Kraftwerk's Computer World album). "Planet Rock" is widely regarded as a turning point in the electro genre."



Cybotron - Clear (1983) [Single]

"1983 electro classic from Detroit originator, Juan Atkins together with 3070, the A-side "Clear" delivered futuristic synth lines, vocoders, and a sinister bassline that served as a shining example of the promise of techno and electro."~vanguard



Herbie Hancock - Rockit (1983) [Single]

"In 1983, jazz musician Herbie Hancock, in collaboration with Grand Mixer DXT, released the hit single Rockit. Constructed and composed during the recording process at various studios, including Martin Bisi's in Brooklyn NY, the composition is the first recognized popular single to feature scratching and other turntablist techniques, performed by GrandMixer D.ST - an influential DJ in the early years of turntablism."



Newcleus - Computer Age (Push the Button) (1984) [Single]

Newcleus recorded "Jam-On's Revenge", a block party favorite which featured vocals that were sped up. It was re-released later that year on Sunnyview Records as "Jam On Revenge (The Wikki-Wikki Song)", and it made the Top 40 on the U.S. R&B chart. Computer Age (Push the Button)" was a more mature single, with accomplished rapping and better synthesizer effects, and it also hit the R&B Top 40."



Will post modern Electro / Electro House tomorrow.
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby itroitnyah » 15 Feb 2013 21:29

Wow, these are all really cool. Thanks, Freewave
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 16 Feb 2013 08:24

Thanks man.

Ok let's get a little modern.

Electro House

The most obvious precursor to the modern Electro House scene (sometimes just referred to as Electro) is the Electroclash movement of the early 2000's. French House has also been considered a strong influence (especially Daft Punk who evolved with many artists into a French Electro sound as well). Kitsuné Music and Modular Recordings have been two of the the three major labels for Electro House which has also been known as the moniker Dirty House or Blog House (or in some cases even New Rave). What they do have in common is dark stabbing basslines (evolved from Electroclash without the throwback 80's sound) and ties into the Dance-Punk Revival. Starting in 2005 Electro House has become one of the dominant movements in dance music. Part of the success of the genre is the flood of remixes by a large majority of the artists involved in it and their complimentary relationships with remixing each other's work.

Main List

List for French Electro

Highlights


Vitalic - "Poney 01" from Poney EP (2001) [EP]

"With the possible exception of a certain French house duo whose name we won't bring up quite just yet, it's difficult to think of another dance act whose career ascent has been as storybook as Pascal Arbez's. After toiling for years in relative obscurity under the aliases Dima (as good as the name suggests) and Hustler Pornstar (uh, ditto), the Frenchman didn't just draw blood with Vitalic's 2001 Poney EP, he lopped a few arteries. Seriously, it's hard to overstate the response to Poney; of its four tracks, three became high-tide dancefloor staples. Along with the dark, yawning electro of "Poney Part 1" and "Poney Part 2", there was the centerpiece "La Rock 01", still the reigning champion of songs that sound like paper shredders orgying in a wind tunnel.

While everyone from 2 Many DJs to Aphex Twin to Sven Väth was busy corking their sets with one (or two, or three...) tracks from Poney, Arbez was studiously lifting a few PR moves from his contemporaries, first by playing up his anonymity and later by concocting an elaborate backstory. He applied a similar selectivity to his output, issuing only a few 12"'s and a handful of choice remixes over the next few years. That lull didn't do much to temper the weighty expectations placed on his full-length debut. Happily, I can't imagine anyone who cared for Vitalic's earlier material being disappointed with Ok Cowboy (2005). "~Pitchfork




Daft Punk - "Technologic" Human After All (2005)

"As I mentioned, I wanted to look at the main influence, the godfather on this whole French new electro/disco scene, Daft Punk. Daft Punk should be pretty familiar to everyone, although I'm not sure how well known they are beyond their bigger club songs like "Around the World" and "One More Time." While those are great songs no doubt, they tend to obscure how amazing Daft Punk's music is. These guys aren't just responsible for a few hits, but rather amazing albums in a non-album genre.

"Technologic" is just one of those great songs, which came out on 2005's Human After All. This album did not get good reviews, although this song was considered the highlight by most. For the record, I don't think the album is that bad, and totally foresee a day 10 years from now when there is whole slew of DJs and producers who worship this album"~blog"




Justice - "Waters of Nazareth (Erol Alkan's Durrr Durrr Durrrrrr Re-Edit)" Waters of Nazareth (Part 2) (2006) [EP]

"The first single from Justice, a pair of French remixers affiliated with the fashionably coked-up Paris label Ed Banger, "Waters of Nazareth" is the sort of hammering destructo-blast that we thought Europeans had forgotten how to make. The track starts with a distorted, flanged-out synth riff and a stomping house beat that sounds like it's being pounded on upside-down oil-drums. The base elements are noisy and fucked, but the track's construction is classic house, and it would sound pretty and florid if they'd played the riff on pianos instead of dying synths. "Waters of Nazareth" moves with a sort of desperate, claustrophobic lurch-- there's no empty space anywhere-- but it still builds and unfolds on its own schedule. "~Pitchfork




deadmau5" - Ghosts 'n' Stuff (full original)" from For Lack of a Better Name (2009)"

A true success story of 2009, emerging from the progressive house underground to become a chart contender, deadmau5 – or Toronto-based Joel Zimmerman to his folks – is in a rare position of being both critically feted and able to court serious attention from the mainstream.

This new album – his own material, but sequenced so it doesn’t stop for even a second’s silence – features Zimmerman’s popular collaboration with Pendulum’s Rob Swire, Ghosts ‘n’ Stuff. At the time of writing the song has enjoyed a fantastic nine weeks inside the UK top 40, making it one of the biggest dance anthems of the year. But better, and included here, is the Moar-prefixed instrumental take on the hit – it’s like Hammer Horror Justice, or a brain-damaged Daft Punk, and every bit as evilly euphoric as that sounds.

A neat introduction to an artist with a wealth of material beneath his belt, this enjoyable compilation of tracks old and new will only further Zimmerman’s already admirable reputation, expanding his audience into whole new areas of approval. Let’s just hope he never spoils everything by taking that brilliantly silly mask off."~BBC



Here's a little video documentary teaser just about how "Electro" in it's various names and styles was blurring music and audiences.


So Electro (which may have initally really been lead by the French) became quickly an international scene with all these different players involved. With different audiences, from indie (blog house/nu rave) to pop (electropop, lady gaga) to edm (beatport generation, the club scene) it really proliferated and split off in branches as quickly as dubstep did.
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby ghelded_kultz » 19 Feb 2013 00:54

Yup. I definitely like electro more than electro house. Thanks again for these posts, Freewave.
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby ghelded_kultz » 20 Feb 2013 09:04

^ I am pretty liberal with genres and I wouldn't consider that a genre. Japanoise though...

As far as obscurity, I guess that is pretty subjective. I've at the very least been aware of every genre (except suomisandi) mentioned so far (though servery lacking in anything other than basic knowledge for electro, elctroclash and the psytrance ones).
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 20 Feb 2013 12:17

TheBronyChip wrote:woah i just noticed how obscure most of these genres are (at least in my area of the world)
heck if you wanna go super obscure you might as well go with "japanese people shitting on microphones"
it actually exists im not even joking its the weirdest shit ever (hard to find though)


You must be talking about The Gerogerigegege. I guess Noisecore and Japanoise are the closest genres although they did i think only one ep of recorded pooping. :lol: They really are one of the greatest examples of troll music meeting art. Japan does have a big avante-garde branch that gets into noise and the anti-noise of Onkyo and EAI.

I might as well do a general Noise highlight and get that out of the way. While some may say "and the rest is all noise" its important to know that Noise (and especially Harsh Noise) is its own genre and something that fans actually do judge and rate as art. Also Noise and Noise Rock are different.

Noise

"Noise music includes a wide range of musical styles, and sound based creative practices, that feature noise as a primary aspect. It can feature acoustically or electronically generated noise, and both traditional and unconventional musical instruments. It may incorporate live machine sounds, non-musical vocal techniques, physically manipulated audio media, processed sound recordings, field recordings, computer generated noise, stochastic processes and other randomly produced electronic signals such as distortion, feedback, static, hiss and hum. There may also be emphasis on high volume levels and lengthy, continuous pieces. More generally noise music may contain aspects such as improvisation, extended technique, cacophony and indeterminacy, and in many instances conventional use of melody, harmony, rhythm and pulse is often dispensed with."

Full List

Highlights

Lou Reed - "Metal Machine Music, part I" from Metal Machine Music (1975)

One of the most divisive albums in music. "One would be hard-pressed to name a major artist who ever released an album as thoroughly alienating as Lou Reed's Metal Machine Music; at a time when noise rock and punk had yet to make their presence known, Reed released this 64-minute aural assault that offered up a densely layered soundscape constructed from feedback, distortion, and atonal guitar runs sped up or slowed down until they were all but unrecognizable. Metal Machine Music seems a bit less startling today, now that bands like Sonic Youth and the Boredoms have created some sort of context for it, but it hasn't gotten any more user friendly with time -- while Thurston Moore may go nuts on his guitar like this for three or four minutes at a stretch, Metal Machine Music goes on and on and on for over an hour, pausing only for side breaks with no rhythms, melodies, or formal structures to buffer the onslaught. If you're brave enough to listen to the whole thing, it's hard not to marvel at the scope of Reed's obsession; it's obvious he spent a lot of time on these layered sheets of noise, and enthusiasts of the violent guitar freakout may find it pleasing in short bursts. But confronting Metal Machine Music from front to back in one sitting is an experience that's both brutal and numbing."~AMG



Merzbow - 1930 (1998)"

The reason this is one of Merzbow's most popular albums is simply because its one of his best statements, and surely one of the most cohesive records in the noise diaspora. Harsh, hypnotic and ultimately dynamic, with plenty of interesting textures that feel like different patterns every time they hit your ears, 1930 is not some sort of aural endurance contest (that'd be Pulse Demon, right). It is instead a deliberately crafted experience all to itself. Beautiful is certainly not the right word for it, but expansive might be. Acoustically expansive, that is. Just listening to 1930 once can be a caustic, head-throttling experience if you pay attention; but if you want to go that extra mile, put it on as you drift off to sleep and let it resonate through your body as you maintain that place halfway between reality and dreamland. That will certainly open some windows in your mind, and maybe even destroy the frames."



Kevin Drumm - "Hitting the Pavement" from Sheer Hellish Miasma (2002)

"Where Yellow Swans mainly use synths and electric guitar, particularly on At All Ends and Going Places and hence comparisons with Skullflower, to generate walls of noise, Illinois native Kevin Drumm plunged headlong into the difficult (some would say terrifying) realm of digital noise on Sheer Hellish Miasma (2002, Editions Mego). Pure digital noise is surely one of the most difficult sub-genres of modern music out there, although sometimes you wouldn't know it, given the close-to-underground-superstar status of Merzbow, who has long been a proponent of hissing, glitching electronic sounds generated on a laptop. Digital noise (at least of the harsh variety, and anything else is liable to be closer to ambient or trance music than actual noise) reverts the genre away from the often melodic or song-structured approaches of a Mouthus or a Wolf Eyes (although harsh digital noise is a component of the latter's sound) and back to what Paul Hegarty described, in his excellent Noise/Music: A History book, as "noise as brutal reduction". noise is a disturbance, defined by what it is not: melodic, tuneful, tonal, etc. Brutal albums such as Prurient's Black Vase or Merzbow's Venereology fall squarely in this category. And, for long passages, so does Sheer Hellish Miasma. From the brutal crunch of the brief opening track and on into the two lengthy pieces that form the record's core, this album overflows with pure saturation, at ridiculous volumes, an all-out sonic assault. But anyone who knows of Drumm's gentle, haunting drone opus Imperial Distortion (2008, Hospital Productions), will know to expect more than simple sensory assault from Drumm. As the epic "Hitting the Pavement" (20 minutes) and "The Inferno" (nearly 25!) unfold, you quickly detect mesmerising shifts and subtle hints of dreamy ambience sliding into the mix, a melodic sense that evolves out of the morass, keeping the listener hooked and even seduced, rather than simply berating him or her with volume, and showcasing his affiliation not just with power noise, but also with experimental music and the wistful drone of Phill niblock, whom he covered for Jim O'Rourke. Don't let that fool you into expecting something "gentle", but closer "Cloudy" lives up to its title, being a quiet ambient wash, like the calm after a beautiful but terrifying storm. This is an essential album for anyone with an interest in noise at its most challenging, but rewarding."~Phimister



Wolf Eyes - "A Million Years" from Human Animal (2006)

"These days, Wolf Eyes may just be the most mainstream noise act out there, and the best known bar Merzbow, courtesy of an unexpected contract with Sub Pop records, who released the second of their WE records, Human Animal in 2006. But the switch to an "overground" record label certainly did not dampen the Michigan trio's noisy spirit, something already demonstrated on Human Animal's predecessor for Sub Pop, 2004's uneven Burned Mind. That album made things clear: Wolf Eyes were not going to blunt their rough edges, as thumping electronic percussion jostled with clattering sound effects and sharp, high-pitched metallic noise of the kind to make dogs scurry for cover. If anything, this is an even more malevolent album, with particularly unsettling vocals, notably on "Rationed Rot" and "The Driller" (surely a reference to Abel Ferrara's notorious "video nasty" The Driller Killer). Most intelligently, though, on Human Animal Wolf Eyes experiment with moments of subtle ambience, spaces of (dis)quiet that engage the listener rather than immediately harass him or her, before hammering things home with bursts of growling feedback, digital noise and skronking sax. It's a scary, dark record, but an intelligent one, and there are few higher compliments I could pay. "



The box set for this is a little weak on explanation so added a bit of reviews and explanation to it. I'll likely get a Noise Rock and Power Electronics this week just to cover some additional expansion to it.
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby TheMalenEst » 20 Feb 2013 13:20

These are fun and really interesting to read. If you ever have time breakbeat would be nice to see :)
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 20 Feb 2013 13:22

Yeah I'll try to cover that soon. Technically breakbeat is somewhat of a parent genre so let me know which one of these you want me to hit next http://rateyourmusic.com/list/TheScient ... _breakbeat
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 20 Feb 2013 14:53

ok let's do this, be afraid, be VERY afraid....the darkest music genre of them all

Power Electronics

"Power Electronics was originally coined by William Bennett as part of the sleevenotes to the Whitehouse album Psychopathia Sexualis although many other artists were experimenting with similar sounds at the time. It is related to the early Post-Industrial scene but later became more identified with Noise music which is now seen as it's parent genre (at least on RYM). It consists of screeching waves of feedback, analogue synthesizers making sub-bass pulses or high frequency squealing sounds, and screamed, distorted, often hateful and offensive lyrics with often beat-less music. In many ways it aims to show the most pessimistic views of humanity in all its forms through it's art (both music and the often provoking album art) and to push the boundaries by focusing on subjects that are often unpleasant and socially reprehensible."

Full List

Highlights

Sutcliffe Jügend - "Reinhard Heydrich" We Spit on Their Graves (1982)"

No need to enjoy Whitehouse once we have this MOTHERFUCKING EPIC FULL OF FUCKING SHIT! However - 10 LPs?! So, it's working in the same concept as Dedicated to Peter Kürten, Sadist and Mass Slayer - that is: sonic reproduction of inner processes of mass slayer - mentally defected and socially incompatible being. It's from some point of view a liberalism put to extreme, but also it's an effort to put the newly discovered sonic ground into some "philosophical context". And while Dedicated to Peter Kürten, Sadist and Mass Slayer from Whitehouse is off earlier than you push play, SJ goes relentlessly for 9,5 hours.

There's a little variation in it, but when you get used to it you'll find some little things that do the magic - some slight differences between and in each particular sides of cassettes. But this is not self-indulgent "anthology" this is a definitive statement of power-electronics and noise, never going to be surpassed: we are harsh, sick, we're going to kill. Putting out unbearable amount of noise and records is a common practice in noise - but it was already in 1982 when they put this out. I don't think that's the best thing about noise subgenre - but it works here.

There are two approaches to noise: one will go back to Iannis Xenakis and John Cage as search for new means of musical expression, other takes noise as the primitive sound of human scum - and there SJ are the kings (fighting with Incapacitants). The second one shall be brutal, illogical, with no barriers - it's after all openly a shit music. are 10 LPs necessary? From musical point of view: fuck no! From the "ideological" point of view it's not even enough, but it's well-balanced. Number of sides refers to number of Sutcliffe's victims (some of them actually haven't died and managed to survive). That's it.

Well, truth is - when you do a lot of shit music intentionally, you will not achieve anti-music, but a lot of shit music. That's not exactly the SJ's case - basically you can start anywhere and it would be still charming. They're good in what they're doing. I had taken it in whole in 3 days and problems actually started in 8th LP, but then there's also nice 24 minutes long "Ten Hours" on 9th - the creative peak of album. It's a masterpiece of decadence and subversion. It makes Foetus sound like children's music. It makes you reconsider your view of life and of art - if you will to go through it. Merzbow is harmless."~xenakis




Whitehouse - "Wriggle Like a Fucking Eel" from Bird Seed (2003)"

Peter Sotos did wonders to this group. bird seed (the song) was the first time audio ever gave me a physical response as strong as a stomach ache. fortunately i found this album during a destructive period in my life and Cut Hands Has the Soloution made me feel a lil better about myself. probably wasn't healthy for me to walk around in the rain listening to this and When Pornography Is No Longer Enough/Victim As Beauty. Ya know whatever the tribal drums add a lot to this and william's lyrics and uh "flow" are incredible. couldn't ask for mor ein a post 21st century industrial album"~ICWater

"Wriggle like a fucking eel and why you never became a dancer are so.. hard. There's no other word. intense in-your-face reality and hate, yet they keep it abstract. clever. Songs that prove they still hate the record industry and the bad parts of life and society as much as in 1980."~earx





Institut - "Move to Strike" from Live Like Traitors, Die Like Traitors (2003)

"Released in 2003, "Live Like Traitors, Die Like Traitors" sees Lirim Cajani shed any 'musical conventions' the group might have ever possessed (such as the fleeting moments of melody evidenced on the album "Great Day To Get Even") along with easily comprehensible vocals (most notable on the controversial, limited 7" "Unto The Last Man") to arrive at an unadultered power electronics / noise industrial experience. Featuring grinding analog electronics, shouted and wailed vocals (which are distorted beyond recognition with the "watery" vocal FX that is a mainstay on many other power electronics albums), and a handful of 'crowd / speech' samples, this album is uncompromising and brutal, in the same manner that the real world in which it operates in is."~musicfortherestofus



I have some Death Industrial on there as part of the set if you want more ambient side of Power Electronics as they crossover a bit but sound different. Again power electronics is about the ugliest of humanity shoved in your face and with absolute malice to where you can't tell if they're arguing against it or for it. Don't think I've ever heard anyone do a Pinkamina Power Electronic album YET.

Next will be Noise Rock with the soothing sounds of Sonic Youth and others.
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 20 Feb 2013 16:50

And today's trilogy of Noise will conclude with

Noise Rock

"Noise-Rock is an outgrowth of punk rock, specifically the sort of punk that expressed youthful angst and exuberance through the glorious racket of amateurishly played electric guitars. Noise-rock, like its forerunner no wave, aims to be more abrasive, sometimes for comic effect and sometimes to make a statement, but always concentrating on the sheer power of the sound. While most noise-rock bands concentrate on the ear-shattering sounds that can be produced by distorted electric guitars, some also use electronic instrumentation, whether as percussion or to add to the overall cacophony. Some groups are more concerned than others about integrating their sonic explorations into song structures; pioneers Sonic Youth helped bring noise-rock to a wider alternative-rock audience when they began to incorporate melody into their droning sheets of sound. Sonic Youth produced a bevy of imitators, but not all noise-rock resembles their music -- '80s bands like the Swans and Big Black took a much darker, more threatening approach, and the Touch & Go label became a center for crazed, shock-oriented takes on the style in the late '80s and '90s.~AMG

Full List

Highlights

Glenn Branca - "LESSON NO. 2" from The Ascension "

Glenn Branca is a genius. I understand that now, nearly 30 years on his ideas are wearing a bit thin and that using 1,000 guitars simultaneously is probably on the other side of necessary, but he still is a nearly incomparable figure in modern music. Of course, Branca himself cops to copping his aesthetics from Rhys Chatham, but most of Chatham's stuff I've heard can't hold a candle to this. Maybe a wet match, but no candle.

Point being, The Ascension is something that I think has no (conceptual) comparison in modern music. It foreshadows three distinct genres of music: Noise Rock, Shoegaze and Post-Rock. Obviously, more mainstream and rockist No Wave probably bears a much larger piece of the credit/blame for Noise Rock (and by extension, Shoegaze) and arguably post-rock has absolutely nothing to do with this record, but quite frankly, I find all those arguments rather moot. The point isn't necessarily that Branca loosed Big Black, My Bloody Valentine and Godspeed on the world, but rather that he had the brains (and to a certain extent, balls) to put something together that honestly, seems completely contemporary to my ignorant ears here in 2010. That, to me, is worth at least a round of applause."~stealthrodeo




Butthole Surfers - Wichita Cathedral from Butthole Surfers (1983) [EP]

"Something needs to be said. This record is a prime example of what "indie-rock" and "alternative rock" used to be...dangerous, disturbing, interesting, intriguing, and well, well outside any sort of affiliation with the mainstream. Along with Scratch Acid, Flipper, Squirrel Bait and others, the Surfers were honestly, seriously fucked up people who made fucked up music. And it was great. You couldn't believe their name, their album graphics, even a song as hypnotic as "Hey" just seethed weirdness. And don't even think about approaching the last track...insane. And even though it would take years, even these guys approached a more accessible sound, leaving us who remembered not even dreaming about missing one of the band's releases. Because although the hardcore drippings of this album would quickly dissipate, the next few records continued a headlong descent into sonic oddity that still hold up today. Imagine Dead Kennedys, Black Sabbath, Syd Barrett and Uncle Floyd jamming...those were the days."~Cirithungol




Swans - "Raping A Slave" from Young God (1984) [EP]

"This EP serves as sort of a transition between the bludgeoning no-wave of Cop and the more experimental gothic sounds of Greed and Holy Money. The mix is psychedelic and overpowering: when you listen to I Crawled it's like Michael Gira's standing right there whispering his twisted lyrics into your ears, and the others are huge and atmospheric thanks to shitloads of reverb.

While Cop was like being tied to a chair and tortured in an abandoned warehouse, Young God is like practicing ritual self-mutilation in your basement while overdosing on LSD and roofies. It's so slow, dark and delirious it sort of makes you feel like you're slowly bleeding to death.

The classic tracks are the title track, featuring some seriously disturbed lyrics about Ed Gein and bizarre, otherworldly percussion noise, and Raping a Slave which takes the crushing doom-industrial approach to its logical conclusion using a brutal, equal parts hypnotic and crushing rhythm (DUH! DUH! DUH-DUH-DUH-DUH-DUH-DUH!) and pretty much serves as a blueprint for Godflesh's Streetcleaner."~RamoneIestKrieg




Big Black - Kerosine from Atomizer (1986)

"My knowledge of Big Black was more in regards to Steve Albini being a go to guy for production for hip bands like Nirvana and the Pixies. In that context of knowledge I never imagined that he would have made his own projects worth checking out. But hey, DJ Premier was not just a classic producer, he had Gang Starr. So too did Steve Albini really make his bones and his reputation as a member of an actual group. Big Black. And of course if these projects were subpar or hell, projects to begin with rather than all out works...why would Black Francis and Kurt have given him any attention to start with? That simply wouldn't have made much sense. So almost as a simple matter of course Big Black had to be good. And they are, oh my they are.
Some call this Noise Rock, like Sonic Youth, but to me it sounds a lot more like something that would need the qualifier "Industrial Punk". Remember how Pere Ubu had these strange industrial sound effects among their bizarro garage rock? Well imagine making those sounds part of the main riffs and melodies! That's Albini. I mean my god, some of the sounds on this record are damn near indescribable. Albini is clearly nearly as talented at making sounds as setting them into good structures. The album's best track is Kerosene; Take your small town boredom and push it to the point that the ultimate escape from it all is self-immolation. Man am I glad I live in an extremely populated metro area with numerous small cities and large towns all sitting next to eachother (with New York in a day trip distance). Albini presents the small town as hell! And his own vocals are as much part of the show sometimes, he screams and yells out in an often hard to discern manner not too far removed from Henry Rollins or even some Metal. There's no other record quite like this ass kicker."




Sonic Youth - "Schizophrenia" from Sister (1987)

"Sonic Youth are one of the greatest bands since punk rock exploded 30 years ago. I have no doubt about that. Yet I would also argue that their best period is from 1986's 'Evol' to 1990's 'Goo'. In those 5 years they were at their peak. The music since is usually good but it doesn't seem as absolutely essential and ground-breaking as what they did in that initial phase.

The heart of things is the guitars. Using open tunings, their guitar lines throb, drone, buzz, sizzle, chime, distort and shriek. Exciting stuff. They have an ear for melody, but they make you work hard at times to discover it. They are absolute masters of moodiness- there is often an ominous atmopshere, though they also manage moments of frigid beauty. But as much as their guitar experiments could be termed an elitist 'art student' project, they mix it up with pop culture references to everything from feminism to comic books, which makes them hard to pigeonhole.

The album opener "Schizophrenia" opens with the kick of a drum, introduces some stormy-sounding guitar, manages a couple of minutes of melody and then disintegrates into a two minute long trail-off of noise, an attempt to set psychic breakdown to guitars. "Catholic Block" is full of seething, barely repressed sexual energy, and songs like "Hot Wire My Heart" offer noisy guitar joy. But the band also manages moments of ethereal, fragile beauty, such as "Cotton Crown". It matches its delicate melody with some gorgeous lyrics. "New York City is forever kitty / I'm wasted in time and you're never ready." When did garage punk ever get this smart?"~paddlestreamer

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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 20 Feb 2013 17:02

Yeah if anyone is reading this thread, bumping it, and commenting to get us a new page would be a GOOD thing as i think it's really needed. Sorry if this is becoming a page of solid embeds. ;)
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Alycs » 20 Feb 2013 17:04

Yeah, it takes a while for them to load with all the videos. I love reading them regardless!

I know most of the stuff you've done so far here is more on the Electric and modern side of music, but I was wondering if you could do one on the Gregorian Chant. In terms of musical influence, I can't think of any style that so heavily influenced the way music is made to this day, from the modal scale structure to duple and triple meter.
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 20 Feb 2013 18:03

Alycs wrote:Yeah, it takes a while for them to load with all the videos. I love reading them regardless!

I know most of the stuff you've done so far here is more on the Electric and modern side of music, but I was wondering if you could do one on the Gregorian Chant. In terms of musical influence, I can't think of any style that so heavily influenced the way music is made to this day, from the modal scale structure to duple and triple meter.


Difficulty with the reym box set project is that its artist/album/song rated and in that order and within in modern recordings. That's partially why our classical sets (minus a few modern ones) have been more shit or not even covered. Since Gregorian Chants aren't necessarily a commercial genre or one that was marketed that long back we don't have a set for it. In terms of what's commercialy available and what people LIKE rym has this as their top albums in their charts which is a decent group of records to look for although the top 4 all seem to be from Hildegard von Bingen.

AMG's write up is here although NO artists are featured. http://www.allmusic.com/artist/gregoria ... 0001633962
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 20 Feb 2013 18:11

Yeah i hope people like the text as i think that's half the story. It's one thing to play a song and it's another thing to explain WHY it's relevent, how it fits into a genre, and then let you listen to it within that context. Most of sets were rather verbose and assembled from lot of quotes from blogs, reviewers, and all kinds of sources in an effort to be like a one-man wikipedia of muisc (as they often drop the ball on a lot of genres to be quite frank).
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby ghelded_kultz » 20 Feb 2013 23:18

I disappear for a couple of hours and some of my favorite genres happen to appear! It's a miracle. A few comments (based on what has been posted from my last comment up to this point):

1) You might want to check you "1930" link. Something seems a little Nu Metally about it.

2) According to my experience, that's a really tame Sutcliffe Jügend song.

3) "Don't think I've ever heard anyone do a Pinkamina Power Electronic album YET. "- I really wanted to send in one for Pinkamena party but then I read some rule/comment that noise wasn't allowed. That isn't to say I won't eventually get to making a power electronics song. Maybe for Celestia.

4) I know it's not your writing, but I think the commenter is understating Branca's importance on Noise Rock, considering that Thurston Moore and Lee Ranaldo were members of his guitar orchestra, and while one can say that Sonic Youth was more No Wave than noise rock, they were still one of the most important artists in the genre.

5) Butthole Surfers. I was just listening to these guys a couple hours before you posted that. Great Band.

I love noise rock. As another suggestion (as if you don't have enough of those), what about microhouse?
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby HMage » 21 Feb 2013 07:26

Needs more saxophone.
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 21 Feb 2013 08:08

HMage wrote:Needs more saxophone.


Everything needs more saxaphone.

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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 21 Feb 2013 08:53

ghelded_kultz wrote:I disappear for a couple of hours and some of my favorite genres happen to appear! It's a miracle. A few comments (based on what has been posted from my last comment up to this point):

1) You might want to check you "1930" link. Something seems a little Nu Metally about it.


Dang i totally got trolled on that. Fixed the link. I didn't have headphones yesterday was trusting that ytubes were legit. :lol:

ghelded_kultz wrote:2) According to my experience, that's a really tame Sutcliffe Jügend song.


Yeah sorry about that, the actual track for the set is ""Master Power". Didn't have many song choices available on youtube. wHY YOUTUBE why?? :(

ghelded_kultz wrote:3) "Don't think I've ever heard anyone do a Pinkamina Power Electronic album YET. "- I really wanted to send in one for Pinkamena party but then I read some rule/comment that noise wasn't allowed. That isn't to say I won't eventually get to making a power electronics song. Maybe for Celestia.


Good man! Let me know if you get one done as I'd like to hear it. I may eventually get a track done but I've been playing it safe lately and trying to stick to dance music. I've done a bit of stuff in the past but hopefully i can do a better job of it now than i did then.

ghelded_kultz wrote:4) I know it's not your writing, but I think the commenter is understating Branca's importance on Noise Rock, considering that Thurston Moore and Lee Ranaldo were members of his guitar orchestra, and while one can say that Sonic Youth was more No Wave than noise rock, they were still one of the most important artists in the genre.


I will agree with that. To many noise rock IS Sonic Youth and while that's not REALLY true they are so vitally important to the genre. I actually didn't know they were in with his orchestra so that's pretty cool! History rerepeating indeed!

ghelded_kultz wrote:5) Butthole Surfers. I was just listening to these guys a couple hours before you posted that. Great Band.

I love noise rock. As another suggestion (as if you don't have enough of those), what about microhouse?


Yeah I wouldn't mind doing a Microhouse / Minimal set. As popular as that in the early 2000's (was as popular as dubstep for awhile) it really hasn't been embraced by bronies or the next generation as much. Shall be done today good sir!!
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby TheMalenEst » 21 Feb 2013 09:07

Freewave wrote:Yeah I'll try to cover that soon. Technically breakbeat is somewhat of a parent genre so let me know which one of these you want me to hit next http://rateyourmusic.com/list/TheScient ... _breakbeat


Progressive breaks :)
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 21 Feb 2013 09:39

Ok Progressive breaks first, then Microhouse. Both are awesome! :D
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Re: Freewave's Genre of The Day Exploration

Postby Freewave » 21 Feb 2013 10:26

Progressive Breaks

"Progressive Breaks (sometimes called other things like breaktrance or ambient breaks) was a very narrow style of breakbeat tracks that existed seperately from the 4/4 beats of progressive house and trance. While often very ambient and downtempo in nature the style took on more of the progressive sound in the mid 90's and changed to a thicker and darker sound. Eventually this developed into the darker Nu Skool Breaks by the late 90's. "

Full List

Highlights

The Future Sound of London - "Papua New Guinea" (1992) [Single]

"Released in 1991, it was meant to be ambient breaks, but "Papua New Guinea's" atmosphere was like little other electronic dance released at the time - ethereal, spacy, almost angelic, but still dancefloor-worthy, catchy, and even relaxing. The song instantly became a trance classic once the genre was brought into official existence in 1993, and deservingly so. Like it's predecessor "Age of Love," even today it can be played without sounding the slightest bit dated."~darktemor

However There IS a difference between breakbeats and 4/4 trance. Lumping this in as a Trance track ignores what makes it "unique" although for the most part progressive breaks as a whole were just lumped in between progressive house and trance sets but never given full attention or an even a widely acknowledged genre name.




Rabbit in the Moon - "O.B.E. (Out-of-Body Experience)"(1993) [Single]

"The second release on Hallucination, a collaberative effort of dave christophere(confucius)& dj monk. Definently a collectors item. Released in 1993, "out of body experience" has become a timeless classic. It has featured of several dj mix cd's,including sasha & john digweed's unforgettable classic "northern exposure" and a "who's who" of techno/electronica compilations. It was later licensed to west coast label Hardkiss with additional mixes added."~positivefresh

Plus it samples Tori fucking Amos :O




GusGus from "Purple (Midnight In Reykjavik remixed by Sasha)" (1997) [Single]

One of my favorite breaks tracks. Featured on Oakenfold's Tranceport but I heard this a few months prior. Absolutely stunning trancey breaks here. If you hear the album version you knew they had the outline of a good track but Sasha outdid himself here.




Hybrid - "Finished Symphony" (1999) [Single]"

EPIC. What more can you say about this seminal tune which comes from the Debut Album 'Wide Angle'. It's a definitive classic. Hybrid's inimitable ability to blend classical with breakbeat and dance music genres (in my opinion at least) has never been matched by this unique and timeless piece of music that will rightfully be listened to over and over again by generations of vinyl junkies." ~partybish



So progressive breaks were something that most people don't widely acknowledge as a genre at all but there were quite a few artists throwing breaks instead of 4/4 into their progressive house tracks and inbetween sets but few artists were committing or championing them as a scene or genre (although Big Beat really beat them to the punch tbf). Most of the artists I highlighted were doing some of their catalog that way. Nu Skool Breaks became a lot more of a thing and an actual scene once Big Beat died (although far less ambient) but continued where Hybrid and BT left off and incorporating some of Funky Breaks sound.
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